It’s funny how today mediocrity won No it’s…

It’s funny how today mediocrity won. No, it’s actually not funny. The assignment wasn’t one that was going to lead to some amazing award-winning frame. (And I’m not going to post a photo or talk about what it was— what you imagine may be better or worse.) But I stood out there for an hour (as long as my parking space allowed) and I shot the scene unfold about a dozen times.

First take, frame too busy.
Dodge traffic, watch for the walk sign, move back to the middle of the street.
Second take, I was a moment late.
Dodge traffic, watch for the walk sign, move back to the middle of the street.
Third take, I wasn’t at the right angle.
Repeat several times.
Let the young, crying lady use my phone. “I just got to town and I got into an argument with my friend. I don’t know anyone here.”

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that it was so damn cold. My hands were going numb, even in the sunshine.

The lady called her friend in Centerville 8x and never got an answer. She stood there crying.
Two trains pulled up and I had another chance to get the shot. I’m distracted thinking about the directions to the shelter and miss the shot for a variety of reasons. I look around and she’s across the street now, reunited with her friend, who is hugging her so tight he’s lifting her off the ground.

Enough about her.

I got back to the office frozen and without a great shot. I had a usable shot, but not a great shot.

And now I’m somewhat warm watching Bones Brigade, An Autobiography, and I’m watching these great skateboarders who influenced me so much in my youth. They are trying and falling, trying and falling, pushing themselves to greater things, over and over.

And I gave up after an hour in the cold.

To reach the greater heights that I’m seeking, I need to convert the frustration of the shot not coming together into a further determination and keep shooting, keeping working the scene. One hour parking spot or no. I need to push harder.

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