Trump’s Attack on the Postal Service Is a Threat to Democracy—and to Rural America

If Republicans succeed in their long-sought goal of privatizing the Postal Service, they will suck out what life remains in many of the communities they theoretically represent.

Link: https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/trumps-attack-on-the-postal-service-is-a-threat-to-democracy-and-to-rural-america
I’ve lived most of my life in small towns in pretty remote rural areas. Some were in red regions, some were purplish-blue—but every last one of them centered on the local post office. I remember years of picking up the mail from a little window in the postmaster’s living room. (If you called her the postmistress, she would tartly reply, “Uncle Sam can’t afford mistresses.”) Eventually, she needed her parlor back, to have room to work on her genealogy projects, so the community built a small freestanding building. Where I live now, the local post office takes up a third of the space in the only business in our town, a country store complete with potbellied stove and rocking chairs. It’s probably why we still have a store: if you’re there to pick up mail, you might as well get some eggs, too.

The Trump Campaign Tries to Change the Subject

A dive into the “exclusive content” from Trump 2020 shows a campaign running away from its candidate’s performance in office.

Link: https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/the-trump-campaign-tries-to-change-the-subject
These ads seem to have come from the same playbook that Trump has been relying on for months now, with little success if you believe the polls. To get a better idea of how the campaign is trying to motivate the President’s loyal supporters and reach out to less committed ones, I downloaded the campaign’s official app, which promised to supply me with “exclusive content and campaign updates.” For a couple of days, I dived into the online Trump world, which turned out to be an immersive experience.