‘An Invisible Cage’: How China Is Policing the Future

‘An Invisible Cage’: How China Is Policing the Future

Vast surveillance data allows the state to target people whose behavior or characteristics are deemed suspicious by an algorithm, even if they’ve done nothing wrong.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/25/technology/china-surveillance-police.html

They can warn the police if a victim of a fraud tries to travel to Beijing to petition the government for payment or a drug user makes too many calls to the same number. They can signal officers each time a person with a history of mental illness gets near a school.

Video: China’s Surveillance State Is Growing. These Documents Reveal How.

Video: China’s Surveillance State Is Growing. These Documents Reveal How.

A Times investigation analyzing over 100,000 government bidding documents found that China’s ambition to collect digital and biological data from its citizens is more expansive and invasive than previously known.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000008314175/china-government-surveillance-data.html

A Times investigation analyzing over 100,000 government bidding documents found that China’s ambition to collect digital and biological data from its citizens is more expansive and invasive than previously known.

How Shanghai Residents Endured the COVID Lockdown

How Shanghai Residents Endured the COVID Lockdown

For more than two months, China’s financial hub, which is home to some twenty-five million people, came to a halt.

via The New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-shanghai-residents-endured-the-covid-lockdown

just to clear the air, a municipal secretary told reporters, “We are not going into lockdown, and it is unnecessary to do a lockdown.” In the following days, Shanghai entered what is known to the rest of the world as a “lockdown.” But the accurate term, according to officials, translates as “whole-area static management.”

The faces from China’s Uyghur detention camps

The faces from China’s Uyghur detention camps

Thousands of photos from a data hack of police files, reveal the human cost of China’s Uyghur detention system.

via BBC News: https://bbc.co.uk/news/extra/85qihtvw6e/the-faces-from-chinas-uyghur-detention-camps

Thousands of photographs from the heart of China’s highly secretive system of mass incarceration in Xinjiang, as well as a shoot-to-kill policy for those who try to escape, are among a huge cache of data hacked from police computer servers in the region.

How China’s Response to COVID-19 Set the Stage for a Worldwide Wave of Censorship

How China’s Response to COVID-19 Set the Stage for a Worldwide Wave of Censorship

Authoritarian governments in eighty nations have enacted restrictions on free speech and political expression that were falsely described as public-health measures.

via The New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-chinas-response-to-covid-19-set-the-stage-for-a-worldwide-wave-of-censorship

on January 23, 2020, the city of Wuhan went into lockdown. The next day, Chen boarded the last train from Beijing to Wuhan. “When disaster happens, if you don’t rush to the front lines as soon as possible, what kind of journalist are you?”

China’s Information Dark Age Could Be Russia’s Future

China’s Information Dark Age Could Be Russia’s Future

Russia and China have the tendency to learn the worst from each other: tyrants, famines, purges and, now, internet censorship.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/18/business/chinas-russia-information.html

“When people ask me how info environment within the Great Firewall is like,” Yaqiu Wang, a researcher at the Human Rights Watch in New York, wrote on Twitter about China’s censored internet, “I say, ‘Imagine the whole country is one giant QAnon.’”

Seeking Truth and Justice, Chinese See Themselves in a Chained Woman

Seeking Truth and Justice, Chinese See Themselves in a Chained Woman

The woman became a symbol of injustice and authorities’ incompetence in fighting human trafficking, posing a credibility challenge to an omnipotent government.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/01/business/china-chained-woman-social-media.html

Two women who tried to visit the chained woman were detained and beaten by local police officers in February. Their posts and social media accounts were deleted. Some social media users who shared their posts said they had gotten calls from the police.

How Beijing Influences the Influencers

How Beijing Influences the Influencers

China’s government has supported foreign YouTubers who put a positive spin on its policies, in its latest effort to shape how the world sees it.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/12/13/technology/china-propaganda-youtube-influencers.html

Joshua Lam and Libby Lange, graduate student researchers at Yale University, analyzed a sample of nearly 290,000 tweets that mentioned Xinjiang in the first half of 2021. They found that six of the 10 most commonly shared YouTube videos in the tweets were from the pro-China influencers.

Does Xi Jinping’s Seizure of History Threaten His Future?

Does Xi Jinping’s Seizure of History Threaten His Future?

The struggles of the first century of Communist Party rule are being buried by the need to cohere around what Xi calls “the great rejuvenation” of China.

Link: https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/does-xi-jinpings-seizure-of-history-threaten-his-future

The full self-portrait won’t be released until after the meeting—which consists of four days of closed sessions—but it’s been clear for months that Xi is determined to eradicate what he calls “historical nihilism,” the corrosive doubt that could threaten the dominance of his party. During the summer, China’s official online Rumor Refutation Platform, a Web site that collects public tips and reports levels of purportedly false content online, warned of attempts to “smear Party history” through what it called efforts to “slander and discredit revolutionary leaders.” Under Chinese law, a person found to have spread a rumor faces up to fifteen years in prison. A list of the “top-ten” most-circulated “rumors” ranged from deep strategic questions—“Did the Communist Party avoid confronting the Japanese army directly?”—to sensitive details, such as the suggestion that Chairman Mao’s son died during the Korean War because he gave away his battlefield position by “cooking egg fried rice.” (Mao Anying died in an air strike in 1950. The fried-rice story, which has never been confirmed, outrages nationalists and Party agencies.)

One by One, My Friends Were Sent to the Camps

One by One, My Friends Were Sent to the Camps

What is it like to live through—and escape—the Uyghur genocide? Tahir Hamut Izgil tells his family’s story in an unprecedented, five-part series.

via The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/the-uyghur-chronicles/

The Chinese government’s mass internment of Uyghurs was in full swing. This campaign had begun in Kashgar, Khotan, and other predominantly Uyghur parts of southern Xinjiang. Now it had reached Urumqi, the regional capital, where our acquaintances were regularly disappearing. Every day, hundreds of Uyghurs who had moved here over the decades—finding work, starting families, buying houses, coming to consider themselves locals—had been shipped out to concentration camps known as “study centers.” Nearly everyone I knew from the labor camp where I’d been imprisoned two decades earlier had already been rearrested. My turn would clearly come soon.

Is Taiwan Next?

Is Taiwan Next?

In Taipei, young people like Nancy Tao Chen Ying watched as the Hong Kong protests were brutally extinguished. Now they wonder what’s in their future.

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/04/magazine/taiwan-china.html

In recent years, Chinese warplanes buzzing the Taiwan Strait’s midline increased substantially, and the country’s warships regularly encircled the island. In March, America’s top military officer in the Indo-Pacific region told a Senate hearing that he believed China could invade Taiwan in the next six years.